You say To-May-Toe, but my To-Mah-Toes are terrific

IMG_4413One of my guidelines for food, work, and life is finding ways not to be negative. If you focus on all that you cannot do, then the negative attitude will follow you around. So whenever I engage in a new venture – diet, relationship, job – I try to focus on what will be positive about it (and not what I can try to change). If the negatives outweigh the pluses, then it is time to take a pass or move on.

Engaging in the Whole30 meant I could focus on all the foods I couldn’t eat – and the list was quite extensive – or what I could. I chose to focus on what I could enjoy. With summer’s bounty ripening outside my doorstep and around Erie County, Pennsylvania, every day, I had plenty of choices. Plus, this supports my choice to eat local and support local farmers.

I’m not going to lie and insist a peach or slice of melon is as satisfying as a bowl of ice cream at the end of the day. But the peach or melon doesn’t carry the baggage of guilt and the accompanying bloating. And an RX chocolate bar isn’t the same as a homemade brownie, but it will do in a pinch. Plus, I’m notorious for cutting off all the edges and eating them – pretending that I really haven’t even had a “real” brownie.

Hah.

The goal, also, wasn’t to make one dinner for me and one for my daughter each night. I don’t think you can ever be successful making a lovely meal for some of the family and then serving yourself something that isn’t as pleasing. Some nights I may have had sausage and homemade tomato sauce with a side of roasted eggplant, while my daughter had the sausage and sauce over pasta.

My homemade roasted tomato sauce is doing many duties. It can become plain sauce, soup, or get jazzed up with add-ins, such as onions, capers, raisins and mint to make a divine sauce for fish or chicken. You can also freeze it and use it in the dead of winter.

Print Recipe
Roasted Tomato Sauce
This versatile sauce can be used alone or combined with other ingredients to make a more elaborate sauce or a simple soup.
Course Main Dish
Cuisine American, Italian
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2-3 hours
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine American, Italian
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2-3 hours
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Cut tomatoes in half. Put into 2 9x13-inch baking dishes. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and herbs.
  3. Bake for about 2 hours. Check after 1 hour to make sure they are OK and not cooking too quickly (if you see brown or black, that's your indication). Turn oven to 400 degrees after 2 hours and roast for about 20-30 minutes (check after 20). They should be slightly brown around the edges.
  4. Allow to cool. You have the choice of running them through a food mill, which will remove the skins and seeds. Or, put them in a high-speed blender (I use a Ninja) and puree until smooth.
  5. Add 1 cup chicken broth. Mix well.
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